Process

17 Sep

I’m not good at recording what I do when I’m in the kitchen. I have tried to correct this quirk, especially with my preserving recipes so I can replicate it (or not) the following year. Usually my best strategy is to have a little notebook next to me, preferably one which can lie flat open and is just the right size to stay in one place while I’m writing. This notebook is used expressly for in-process recipes because it winds up too close to my projects and picks up spills, or at the very least, water spots from my hands all over the pages. Luckily, the recipe I want to talk about here doesn’t need directions. It’s a simple, one-ingredient wonder with a history.

We planted St. Croix variety wine grapes several years ago from a friend’s pruned cuttings. My husband built a lovely structure (Geneva double curtain) for them to grow into and has been vigilantly pruning and caring for them. Every year they produce slightly more fruit, and we are always at a bit of a loss as to what to do with the crop. Last year, I made grape jam and jelly, and I wasn’t really thrilled with either. I happened to catch a tweet from Mario Batali giving advice on what to do with excess Concord grapes—he recommended making mosto cotto (also called saba and vin cotto). I checked out a few recipes and decided that it was a perfect use for the grapes and maybe a perfect condiment for us. It is also a traditional “slow food” which is not made very often anymore, even in Italy. After convincing my husband that we did not have enough grapes to make wine this year, we harvested them and I got to work. About 25 pounds of grapes were destemmed, crushed, strained, and cooked down for two hours to make about a quart of mosto cotto. It’s good—sweet yet balanced with tart acidity, an unctuous texture, and amazing color.

Not only did I create something useful and a product that will last well into the dark days of winter, I felt my husband’s grandmother peering over my shoulder, remembering the process from when she was a little girl, growing up in the south of Italy. It’s a food with a sense of history and a strong sense of place.

**If you’re interested and want to read more about mosto cotto, see the NY Times archived article here for recipes and sources.

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2 Responses to “Process”

  1. Deb September 17, 2012 at 4:31 pm #

    Looks like you had fun, Emily. And you’ve taught me something new yet again. Thank you.

    • Paper Cake Scissors September 17, 2012 at 6:13 pm #

      Thanks, Deb! Glad you found it interesting.

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